Meanwhile, @testingpens over on :

„Wondering about Android and Apple phone security? Here's an objective chart to help you decide:“

twitter.com/testingpens/status

@jwildeboer
That's not objective. It's missing LineageOS on all Android devices, short cycle security updates, long term support.

@erAck @jwildeboer
Exactly. And after EOL iPhones become the least secure phones in the market because you can't even run a new web engine on them. My backup phone is 6+-year-old Samsung S4 Mini. I can run the latest Android (LineageOS) or latest browser (Firefox) on it. Show me that with a 6-year-old iPhone.

@sesivany @erAck Your argument is that an EOL device is, well, EOL? And yes, I can show a whole drawer full of less than 4 year old Android devices that have been abandoned by their respective manufacturers. Some even after a year.

@jwildeboer @erAck I'm not defending the Android vendors. I'm just saying that unlike iPhone Android devices are not usually completely lock-down which has a positive effect on security because it allows me to switch to something that has timely updates and lifetime exceeds the iPhone's. My laptop came with Windows. Do I care about Windows security? Not at all because I installed an OS of my choice the first day I got it.

@sesivany @erAck But I guess we do agree that it's maybe 1% of buyers of devices that install alternative OSes on them. That the majority doesn't even know alternatives exist.

@jwildeboer If people use this chart to decide what phone to buy, this is relevant. If they are educated about the possibility to install LineageOS to get access to OEM- and carrier-independent, frequent updates over a long support period, they might choose that instead of iOS where if their phone is EOL'd by Apple, there is nothing they can do except buying a new phone.
@sesivany @erAck

@colomar @sesivany @erAck But AFAICS LineageOS doesn't support all Android devices and when buying a new device you cannot be sure if it is or will be supported by LineageOS. I honestly wouldn't know how to build a chart with that information included.

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@erAck @colomar @sesivany Yes. And their latest blog entry is from November last year and contains the not-so-reassuring "This week we are dropping a number of 14.1 devices which maintainers are absent or not interested in maintaining them anymore." I am simply not convinced that LineageOS is a consumer-ready replacement for a relevant subset of Android users. But that's IMHO, nothing more.

@jwildeboer @erAck @colomar Yeah, I believe more in projects like @gael's e.foundation/. Not only they solve the security, but they also solve privacy (with both standard Android and iOS you hand over huge amount of your private data to Google and Apple).

@sesivany
We'll probably end up with two phones in the pocket, one privacy-enabled, and another one needed for all those Apps that insist on GCM/FCM (or iOS features); at least as long as the entire stack isn't completely sandboxed and can be run in two VMs in parallel..

@jwildeboer @colomar @gael

@sesivany
Heck I *already* have two phones in the pocket, one for phone calls and one Android toy thing.
@jwildeboer @colomar @gael

@erAck @jwildeboer @colomar @gael

I think /e/ actually has an answer for that because it's reimplementing Google API, so that apps that rely on it can run on a system which doesn't call to Google all the time.

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