So from now on I will use the hashtag while I explore the wonderful world of Tags and their possible potential for my decentralised identity project. I've decided years ago that we first need for such a beast. 1/n

And being in , I also know about the power of brands and names. So a long time ago, while brainstorming, we decided that we are building something that connects people. In secure ways. And the name became obvious. 2/n

The technical fundament, the core standard, has to be called TCP/ID. It's for people what TCP/IP is for machines. An that allows for many, many applications while guaranteeing verifiable interoperabilty. And it sounds cool :) it is :) 3/3

Here's another insight I had a long time ago. Every piece of code is a standard. Not explicit, but implicit. It is hiding in stable APIs and long term sustainability of any Open Source project. Most of the time it can stay in that implicit state.

But sometimes it becomes helpful to translate source code to standard language. Be it an RFC, a full blown ISO standard or anything inbetween. It's helpful because it opens new possibilities AND forces you to stick to your stable API/ABI.

But sometimes it becomes helpful to translate source code to standard language. Be it an RFC, a full blown ISO standard or anything inbetween. It's helpful because it opens new possibilities AND forces you to stick to your stable API/ABI.

That's why since many, many years I have proposed that standards should come with three things: The standard, an reference implementation and a compliance checker for other implementations. It's a simple and obvious way to solve a lot of problems IMHO.

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The problem with most (old school) standards is that they are created the other way around. First the standard, then the implementation. This has often lead to ambiguity that the "standard people" brush away with "read the standard".

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